A fresh start

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

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Peter
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A fresh start

Postby Peter » Fri Jun 06, 2008 2:25 am

About a year ago I made my last attempt at building a Gn15 layout. It didn't go so well (hint to future cardboard layout builders don't lean your new layout against a wall unless you're really certain it won't weep during the next rain storm :cry: ) In anycase it seemed to me like it was time to make a fresh start on a new layout.

So, welcome to Loon's Park, estate works on the Clowe Light Railway.
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Failure is just success rounded down.

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Richard Morton
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Postby Richard Morton » Fri Jun 06, 2008 7:26 am

Hey there Peter so sorry to hear about your first attempt and all.
Could you fill us in a little on what you are doing and using that is different this time around? Also for my interest at least I see that you have one very tight curve on the middle siding what radius are you using there?

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DCRfan
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Postby DCRfan » Fri Jun 06, 2008 8:49 am

I left my cardboard layout in the back of the car on a hot sunny day now the stub points bind :cry:

Then winter came and the garage roof dripped. Guess what was right under the leak. So the cardboard on the side of the baseboard came unstuck :cry: :cry:

I am about to start repairs but will never build a baseboard from cardboard again :)
Paul
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Peter
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Postby Peter » Fri Jun 06, 2008 1:23 pm

I'm aiming for simplicity with this layout
The baseboard is a 30x40 piece of half inch foam art board. I feel this is more then ridged enough for a home layout. Track is unmodified Atlas code 100 flex and switches. I choose these because I have a big box of them I got when a friend switched to N-Scale.

what radius are you using there?

I'm sorry to have to tell you that I don't plan my layouts out to that kind of degree. I had a general idea of what I wanted the end result to look and operate like and then fit the track to match my vision. I have no clue what the measure of any of the curves are. :oops:

I am about to start repairs but will never build a baseboard from cardboard again

Ditto. :(
Failure is just success rounded down.

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Steve Bennett
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Postby Steve Bennett » Fri Jun 06, 2008 3:25 pm

Peter wrote:I'm aiming for simplicity with this layout
The baseboard is a 30x40 piece of half inch foam art board. I feel this is more then ridged enough for a home layout.


Have you braced the foamboard at all Peter, if not, I fear you are heading for trouble. It is surprising what effects glue can have on it. Without bracing it is almost certain to twist and warp. Take that from one that learnt the hard way :wink: .
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AndyA
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Postby AndyA » Fri Jun 06, 2008 5:22 pm

I agree with Steve, But it's okay to use foamboard uprights to make a fairly simple frame. If the track is already laid, build the framing and then use something like PVA on the top of the frame to glue the top in place. If you break it into 300mm squares, then even with 5mm foamcore, 30mm will work. (one foot squares, quarter inch board, inch-and-a-bit high.)

After glueing, cover with paper and weight it with pickle jars and mugs from the mug rack until it makes contact all round. If you have wood or stone kitchen surfaces stick polythene under the frame before applying the PVA. Of course Sue would say use your own work surface, but I find getting up very early in the morning and bringing tea up to bed once the glue is curing disguises the situation sufficiently. :)

regards
Andy A
Gn15: Gnot so much a scale, more a state of mind
gnine: less is the gnew more
GnTonic - enjoy irresponsibly

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Peter
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Postby Peter » Fri Jun 06, 2008 6:29 pm

:shock: Thanks for the warning Steve and Andy, I was going to be gluing in the backdrop this evening, but it looks like I'll be building some bracing instead!

If you break it into 300mm squares, then even with 5mm foamcore, 30mm will work. (one foot squares, quarter inch board, inch-and-a-bit high.)

So basically a torsion table (on a smaller scale) then. I'm going to have to source some small strips of lumber :?
Of course Sue would say use your own work surface

I think your over estimating the size of a typical New York City apartment. The only hard surface I have in my apartment being enough to hold the layout in it's entirety is the floor. I laid the track while balancing the layout on an ironing board.
Failure is just success rounded down.


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